Category Archives: Books

“Learning a Living” – Valerie Hannon and Reza present WISE Book 2012

“Learning a Living” Book Presentation

Picture 23

In November 2012, WISE presented its WISE Book 2012 “Learning a Living” in Doha, Qatar. The book looks into the relationship between education, innovation and the world of work. After surveying 100 programmes, it identified fifteen high-impact radical innovation projects addressing the issue learning for work. It’s not just a collection of best practices – it tells their compelling stories. The book will be available on Amazon from March 2013.

Watch the video of the presentation made by the lead author of the book, the brilliant Valerie Hannon, director of The Innovation Unit in Britain (I remember being impressed by Ms Hannon at the OECD conference at my university in Vienna back in 2011).

She does a great job here by presenting some of the key projects from the book, while putting them in the context of a general message, which she unfolds along her presentation on the background. You can also listen to Reza, a well known National Geography photographer, who shot the photos.

The projects come from a broad variety of countries (like the USA, Morocco, Brazil, Kuwait, Nicaragua and others) showing many types of innovations. Ms Hannon underlines, that even though it’s a beautiful book, it’s not for the ‘coffee table’. It puts forward an argument about ‘learning for work’ (not ‘training for work’), which the authors believe has major implications for ‘learning’ in general.

In their methodology, the researchers put three questions:

1) What’s happening to the world of work?

2) What’s happening to the workforces and their needs?

3) How should learning be organised to meet those needs?

The problem they saw was that:

a) the picture of the world of work ‘has changed beyond recognition’,

b) the needs of workforces (that is of all citizens) which have changed too;

c) but learning hasn’t changed in terms of its organisation or design to meet those needs.

With this book as a backdrop, the ambivalent position of educational planners between the ‘market needs’ approach and the ‘liberal education’ approach, especially on the background of radical economic changes, really needs special attention. I’ll make a posting on that soon…

Back to the book, from the innovative projects chosen, the book picks up lessons from their

a) pedagogy;

c) their approach to curriculum;

d) their approach to assessment;

e) what is ‘intrinsically fascinating about these practices and how can they be scaled up.

Doing the book had ‘a profound effect’ on Valerie Hannon and her team. In talking to learners worldwide, again and again, the message they were hearing was that …

“The education system for the most part is not a part of the solution, its part of the problem”

It was ‘a shocking finding’, she said.

I draw the rationale of the book from her comment: “…the whole piece how people are educated to learn a living has significant implications on how we organise learning in totality.”

They looked into projects that addressed people from age 4 to age 95 (!). However, someone asked Valerie: “Why stop at 95?”  : )) I wont tell you more…enjoy this wonderful presentation full of surprises and inspiring sparks !!!

If you want to read the first chapter, go to issuu:

http://issuu.com/bloomsburypublishing/docs/learning_a_living_chapter_1_3